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Dog Federation
of Wisconsin


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Promoting and Protecting Responsible Dog Ownership Contact ::  Links ::  FAQ 
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Future Dog Owners


Just Good, Common Sense Advice - Without the Negative Hoopla

The most important decision you'll make in getting a dog is the choice of breed. Many dogs end up returned to the breeder or dropped at a shelter simply because not enough thought was put into whether the breed was suitable for the home.

Try Purina's online Dog Breed Finder here.

The second most important decision is your choice of breeder. Whether your dog is healthy, has a sound temperament, has been started in housetraining, are all dependent on the breeder. A good one will be there for backup whenever you need it, and will welcome the dog back if at any time you cannot keep it.

Thirdly, purchasing a dog is no time for indulging in "instant gratification". Do your research, talk to other dog owners at local shows, trials and pet expos.

Make sure you are comfortable with where your dog has come from. For every puppy bought in a pet store or at a flea market, another litter is bred, and the more clever salespeople encourage you to feel sorry for the puppies so you will "rescue" them. This is by no means "Rescue" - this is supporting the cycle that keeps pet shops selling puppies. Don't contribute to this cycle.

A good breeder will make sure you know the breed's drawbacks and any special breed requirements.

All breeds have some drawbacks. If the breed you're considering drools a lot, is hard to housebreak, does not live long, or may instinctively chase and kill small animals, or (fill in the blank!) a good breeder makes sure you understand those characteristics. If your dog must be kept as an indoor dog, must always be leashed or fenced, requires lots of grooming, or is subject to heatstroke, a responsible breeder tells you these things upfront. If a breeder starts to sound like a used-car salesman, telling you only the good things and she refuses to talk about the bad ones, find another breeder.

Again, do your research. Your future dog is counting on it.

 

This appears courtesy of the good folks at Timbreblue and Kelly Wichman. For breed specific or training information, please contact the DFOW member club near you.

 

 

 


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Did you know?

Well bred dogs will likely cost less over the lifetime of the dog. A pet puppy from a show breeder is generally the same price or less than one purchased in a pet store.


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Copyright 2009, Dog Federation of Wisconsin
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